Project Management in Practice - a 2-day course – EY Academy of Business

Project Management in Practice – a 2-day course

Success in practical project management is based on two pillars:
  • Understanding that a project plan may only be “good enough”, but it will never be “perfect” (or else the case is actually not a project, but a different kind of task…).
  • Implementing such rules of monitoring project realisation that enable early notification about emerging threats and that ensure the maximum flexibility of resources engaged in realising specified tasks.
This 2-day workshop aims at giving the participants the tools enabling the implementation of these rules in practice and working out a proper attitude of each project team member. The training is based on the assumption that the participants will spend about 60% to 70% of the workshop on applying the tools they have learnt to their own projects, from everyday life of their organisation.

  • People who wish to learn or refresh the basic knowledge and skills related to project management
  • People who are about to begin their adventure with project management

The method

Real projects submitted by the participants form the basis of the workshop. 2-3 projects are selected and exercises are formed in relation to those projects. All exercises are completed in groups of 3-6 persons. Participants perform them, drawing up a case study of the historical project, which are demonstrated rules for implementing the individual steps. 50% of the time can be devoted to work on your own projects.

After completing the workshop the participant is able to:

  • Determine when one should use the design approach
  • Assess which project management tools should be used in a given context
  • Use various tools for planning and supervising the project
  • Compose an isolated plan and order the execution of a small project

As a result:

  • Improved communication between team members
  • People are clearly assigned to the tasks, roles and responsibilities in the project
  • Improved teamwork
  • Lower amount of stress when planning the project
Introduction
  • What is a project and what makes it different from the other ways of work?
  • Why can a project plan be only “good enough”, but never “perfect” and what are the consequences? How to formulate a project mission statement?
  • What are the phases of planning a project? Which of them is the most difficult and which one is the most important?

Defining the project

  • Why is project defining the most difficult area in project planning?
  • What are project goals? What kinds of goals should be considered? Why is the discussion about defining targets one of the most difficult discussions while planning a project?
  • What are project products and how do they differ from project goals? Why does it take place?
  • How to set priorities in a project? Why is it necessary to set them before commencing the detailed planning of a project, whereas later it will be practically impossible to set them?
  • Why mustn’t the WBS be first prepared with a computer?
  • Why, when working on the WBS, is the process more important than the result?
  • What is a project network and what is it created for?
  • How to verify the accuracy of the project network?
  • What does the stage project planning consist in? What are the advantages?
  • What does the model structure of project management look like? What roles does it include?

Estimating resources

  • What are the methods of estimating resources and when should they be applied?
  • How to define who is needed for realisation and managing work in a project?
  • How to establish the accountability for realisation and managing work? How to write down the accountability?

Preparing a schedule

  • What is a schedule and what is it used for?
  • What does the standard approach to preparing a schedule consist in and why doesn’t it work in practice?
  • How to enhance the critical path method to ensure it helps and does not hinder in everyday project management?

Supervision of project realisation

  • What methods of monitoring progress of work in the project can be applied and what negative consequences will it entail? What does practical experience show?
  • Why does every experienced project manager intuitively adapt a number of good practice behaviours, which, at first, may appear to be inconsistent with the art of project management?
  • What rules and code of conduct does a project manager have to establish and implement to make sure that they do control the progress of work?
  • What early “warning system” should be implemented in the scope of these rules to ensure practical risk management in projects?
Project Management in Practice – a 2-day course
Success in practical project management is based on two pillars:
  • Understanding that a project plan may only be “good enough”, but it will never be “perfect” (or else the case is actually not a project, but a different kind of task…).
  • Implementing such rules of monitoring project realisation that enable early notification about emerging threats and that ensure the maximum flexibility of resources engaged in realising specified tasks.
This 2-day workshop aims at giving the participants the tools enabling the implementation of these rules in practice and working out a proper attitude of each project team member. The training is based on the assumption that the participants will spend about 60% to 70% of the workshop on applying the tools they have learnt to their own projects, from everyday life of their organisation.
For whom?

  • People who wish to learn or refresh the basic knowledge and skills related to project management
  • People who are about to begin their adventure with project management
Objectives and benefits

The method

Real projects submitted by the participants form the basis of the workshop. 2-3 projects are selected and exercises are formed in relation to those projects. All exercises are completed in groups of 3-6 persons. Participants perform them, drawing up a case study of the historical project, which are demonstrated rules for implementing the individual steps. 50% of the time can be devoted to work on your own projects.

After completing the workshop the participant is able to:

  • Determine when one should use the design approach
  • Assess which project management tools should be used in a given context
  • Use various tools for planning and supervising the project
  • Compose an isolated plan and order the execution of a small project

As a result:

  • Improved communication between team members
  • People are clearly assigned to the tasks, roles and responsibilities in the project
  • Improved teamwork
  • Lower amount of stress when planning the project
Programme
Introduction
  • What is a project and what makes it different from the other ways of work?
  • Why can a project plan be only “good enough”, but never “perfect” and what are the consequences? How to formulate a project mission statement?
  • What are the phases of planning a project? Which of them is the most difficult and which one is the most important?

Defining the project

  • Why is project defining the most difficult area in project planning?
  • What are project goals? What kinds of goals should be considered? Why is the discussion about defining targets one of the most difficult discussions while planning a project?
  • What are project products and how do they differ from project goals? Why does it take place?
  • How to set priorities in a project? Why is it necessary to set them before commencing the detailed planning of a project, whereas later it will be practically impossible to set them?
  • Why mustn’t the WBS be first prepared with a computer?
  • Why, when working on the WBS, is the process more important than the result?
  • What is a project network and what is it created for?
  • How to verify the accuracy of the project network?
  • What does the stage project planning consist in? What are the advantages?
  • What does the model structure of project management look like? What roles does it include?

Estimating resources

  • What are the methods of estimating resources and when should they be applied?
  • How to define who is needed for realisation and managing work in a project?
  • How to establish the accountability for realisation and managing work? How to write down the accountability?

Preparing a schedule

  • What is a schedule and what is it used for?
  • What does the standard approach to preparing a schedule consist in and why doesn’t it work in practice?
  • How to enhance the critical path method to ensure it helps and does not hinder in everyday project management?

Supervision of project realisation

  • What methods of monitoring progress of work in the project can be applied and what negative consequences will it entail? What does practical experience show?
  • Why does every experienced project manager intuitively adapt a number of good practice behaviours, which, at first, may appear to be inconsistent with the art of project management?
  • What rules and code of conduct does a project manager have to establish and implement to make sure that they do control the progress of work?
  • What early “warning system” should be implemented in the scope of these rules to ensure practical risk management in projects?

Price

EUR 635 net

Location

Online

Date

5-6 October 2022

Contact

Natalia Medyńska

Course coordinator

  • +48 789 407 645
  • natalia.medynska@pl.ey.com